Sense of Place: Birminghams Black Middle-Class Community, 1890-1930

Found 83 related Books

You are about to access Sense of Place: Birminghams Black Middle-Class Community, 1890-1930.Access Speed for this file: 78124 KB/Sec

Loading

Free Membership Registration to Download

Our library can be accessed from certain countries only.

Please, see if you are eligible to read or download Sense of Place: Birminghams Black Middle-Class Community, 1890-1930 by creating an account.

You must create a free account in order to read or download this book.

Sense of Place: Birminghams Black Middle-Class Community, 1890-1930 by Lynne B. Feldman.pdf

Uploaded : 2018/05/27 

Last checked : 47 Minutes ago!

Status : AVAILABLE
User rating : 5 / 4
 Downloads : 1212
 

doc
pdf
docx
mobi
djvu
epub
ibooks


01

Descriptions : In the early 20th century, city boosters in Birmingham, Alabama, annexed the town of Smithfield as part of a larger effort to enlarge the city and broaden its tax base While the area attracted both whites and blacks seeking to escape the city s cramped living conditions, African Americans, especially, found Smithfield enticing Here, separated from the city where Jim Crow In the early 20th century, city boosters in Birmingham, Alabama, annexed the town of Smithfield as part of a larger effort to enlarge the city and broaden its tax base While the area attracted both whites and blacks seeking to escape the city s cramped living conditions, African Americans, especially, found Smithfield enticing Here, separated from the city where Jim Crow laws restricted their day to day activities, middle class blacks found they were able to assert considerable influence over their home environments.

Lynne Feldman draws from a wealth of primary sources, including personal interviews, to demonstrate how such a community developed and thrived She finds that middle class blacks, guided by a philosophy of self improvement, racial solidarity, and economic independence, actively shaped the world around them, developing black businesses, private clubs, and institutions that promoted community pride and provided refuge from racial discrimination Blacks developed a workable relationship with white benefactors to achieve some of these important civic improvements.

The community certainly struggled with internal conflicts Feldman s study, for example, reveals how middle class blacks separated themselves socially from lower class blacks, while relying on them to patronize their businesses In general, however, African Americans in this protective environment could assert their independence, nurture personal relationships, and develop strategies to implement progress.











9182 Users Online